RV Roof Replacement: Know When Your Roof is Beyond Repair

For the most part, choosing whether to repair or replace your RV’s roof is a personal preference. However, there are going to be some situations when a full RV roof replacement presents the better, or even necessary, option. Knowing when that is can save you a lot of stress and help you avoid causing further damage to your RV’s roof and the structure underneath.

Here are some signs that your roof is probably ready for replacement, rather than another repair:

  • The repair is more expensive than a replacement. Although obvious, this is the primary reason that owners choose an RV roof replacement as opposed to a repair. After all, you are looking for the most affordable way to protect your investment. If a new roof is cheaper, it doesn’t make sense not to go that route.
  • The damaged area is too extensive. This is slightly subjective. However, if the damage on your roof covers more than 30% of the roof, it might be in your best interest to at least get quotes on a full replacement. If you aren’t certain, you can get an estimate from the professionals. You don’t have to let them do the job, but they can give you an idea of the costs involved and which option is better.
  • The structure underneath the roof or the fixtures (such as vent fans or hatches) are damaged. In this situation, you can’t really repair the areas that need it without removing the old roofing material first. Therefore, a replacement is the only thing that makes sense.
  • The age of the roof is a good indicator. A roof that is only 10 years old, for example, might be fine to repair even if the damage is significant. A 20-year-old roof, on the other hand, will be better to replace regardless of what repairs are needed. Most RV roofs last a maximum of 25 years, so keep that in mind when considering your options.
  • Whatever damage or issues your roof is facing require a long-term solution. Repairs are typically a short-term solution, and may not always get the job done. You might think you are saving money by doing a small repair now, but when you have to repair it every six months, you might think again. In this situation, a replacement offers a better long-term solution for any kind of roof damage or deterioration.
  • You already have multiple layers of roofing materials. Although it is usually fine to have a layer or two of rubber roofing and/or sealants on an RV, you don’t want too much to build up. This can put unnecessary strain on the roof and add too much weight to the vehicle. If you’ve already done a lot of repairs or cover-ups, it might be time for a full RV roof replacement.

Replacement Time: Consider New Materials

Humans are creatures of habit. If their RV has a rubber roof, the chances are high that they will look specifically into a rubber roof replacement. Although there are multiple types of roofing materials available for RVs today, people are not always aware of all of the options. Do yourself a favor since you are replacing the roof anyway, and explore the materials available to see which ones best suit your needs.

A popular option for versatility, convenience, and durable longevity is the liquid rubber roof. This product is easy to apply, levels itself during application, and will air-dry to a flexible, watertight seal in a matter of hours. Plus, it adds an extra layer of protection around seams and fixtures that you don’t get from materials like fiberglass or TPO, which are much more solid, sheet-like products.

Regardless of what you choose, trust that you are making a solid investment in your RV by replacing the roof when it is necessary. There is a time and place for minor repairs, but they might not always do the job. Keep these tips in mind when deciding what to do with the roof on your RV.